Posts Tagged: kidslit

Have You Seen the Stanley Books by William Bee?

One of the joys of being a librarian is having access to an enormous quantity and variety of material. Every now and again I will discover an author and/or illustrator who is new to me and sometimes their work is

Have You Seen the Stanley Books by William Bee?

One of the joys of being a librarian is having access to an enormous quantity and variety of material. Every now and again I will discover an author and/or illustrator who is new to me and sometimes their work is

Radiant Author: Javaka Steptoe Shares Inspiration, Heartache and Ambition

Javaka Steptoe was all over book news in January, but new interviews and stories continue to post. One of the most interesting interviews I’ve heard with Mr. Steptoe is by Jesse Thorn, for the Bullseye program. Steptoe speaks of the impact that

Radiant Author: Javaka Steptoe Shares Inspiration, Heartache and Ambition

Javaka Steptoe was all over book news in January, but new interviews and stories continue to post. One of the most interesting interviews I’ve heard with Mr. Steptoe is by Jesse Thorn, for the Bullseye program. Steptoe speaks of the impact that

Bats: Learning to Fly is the New, Non-Fiction Graphic Novel That Every Children’s Library Needs

Bats: Learning to Fly is the latest triumph in the fabulous science graphic novel series, Science Comics. Each title introduces young readers to a different topic which is well researched, vetted and approved by a scientific expert. Little Brown Bat

Bats: Learning to Fly is the New, Non-Fiction Graphic Novel That Every Children’s Library Needs

Bats: Learning to Fly is the latest triumph in the fabulous science graphic novel series, Science Comics. Each title introduces young readers to a different topic which is well researched, vetted and approved by a scientific expert. Little Brown Bat

Ed Vere’s Max Books Are Funny Delights

Max has caught my eye and my heart. He’s an inquisitive black cat with huge yellow eyes and a ton of courage. The text in the books are simple and concise and the illustrations are crisp, colorful and hilarious. The

Ed Vere’s Max Books Are Funny Delights

Max has caught my eye and my heart. He’s an inquisitive black cat with huge yellow eyes and a ton of courage. The text in the books are simple and concise and the illustrations are crisp, colorful and hilarious. The

“Ballad” is Strange and Satisfying Work of Art Disguised as a Children’s Book

Ballad is a pleasure to hold. Measuring 1.2 x 5.5 x 7 inches, the book is both tiny and thick. The hardcover binding immediately gives a tactile pleasure to the reader with its textured surface. The pleasures continue with print-block

“Ballad” is Strange and Satisfying Work of Art Disguised as a Children’s Book

Ballad is a pleasure to hold. Measuring 1.2 x 5.5 x 7 inches, the book is both tiny and thick. The hardcover binding immediately gives a tactile pleasure to the reader with its textured surface. The pleasures continue with print-block

Have You Seen the Picture Book Illustrations of Gabi Swiatkowska?

  Shelving books one day in the library, I was struck by an illustration style with classic elements, and an airy feeling that encouraged me to ask, “Who drew this?” The book was Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford, which joyfully questions how

Have You Seen the Picture Book Illustrations of Gabi Swiatkowska?

  Shelving books one day in the library, I was struck by an illustration style with classic elements, and an airy feeling that encouraged me to ask, “Who drew this?” The book was Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford, which joyfully questions how

Children’s Book Week: ‘Mighty Dads’ by Joan Hulub & Illustrated by ‘Pete the Cat’ Creator, James Dean

Mighty Dads by Joan Holub Illustrated by James Dean                               Repetitive patterns and onomatopoeia fill the text of Mighty Dads. A book with no human characters,

Children’s Book Week: ‘Mighty Dads’ by Joan Hulub & Illustrated by ‘Pete the Cat’ Creator, James Dean

Mighty Dads by Joan Holub Illustrated by James Dean                               Repetitive patterns and onomatopoeia fill the text of Mighty Dads. A book with no human characters,